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the12volt`s installbay - Mobile Electronics Forums the12volt's install bay / Fiberglass, Fabrication, and Interiors

Subject Topic: spray on body filler? (Topic Closed Topic Closed)

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mr.devil
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Posted: April 30, 2007 at 7:43 PM - IP Logged  

Spray on body filler??? I haven't tryed this stuff yet so I'm researching it first.  How good is it and is there anything comparable to it?  I've heard of people refering to it as a really thick primmer for automotive use?.  Where can I get it and do I need a special paint gun for shooting it?
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bellsracer
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Posted: May 01, 2007 at 4:17 PM - IP Logged  

I've used it... It's decent stuff, but you heard right, it's essentially a REALLY thick spray on primer. It works wonders as an alternative to bondo on curved surfaces especially. Sands easily and makes a beautiful finish (with no wax to sand off)

A good body shop will have it and you do not need a special gun for most of them. HOWEVER, as soon as you notice the primer hardening and gelling, immediately pour it out of the gun and in a disposable container. Then run acetone through the gun until it comes out clear. Any of the primer left in the gun will haren and cause more trouble than it's worth (sometimes ending up tossing the gun away)

Ganbatte ne!


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mr.devil
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Posted: May 01, 2007 at 6:28 PM - IP Logged  

Thanks for the info bellsracer, I'll have to give it a try on my next project.  What's the best finishing grit to use on the primer if painted will be the final look, 400, 320?
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bellsracer
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Posted: May 01, 2007 at 10:30 PM - IP Logged  

400 will be fine. 320 tends to leave fine lines that you can't see until you paint it.

Depending on the paint, you can probably even take it to 600. Either way, add clear to the project and give that a polish for the "wet look" and more professional elite finish.

Ganbatte ne!


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The 3Ls of life: Learn from the Past, Live for the Present, Look to the Future.
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mr.devil
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Posted: May 02, 2007 at 7:26 PM - IP Logged  

Cool, thanks again!  Since you sound like you know your stuff, here's another question for you that I didn't want to post on the main forum.  I'm planning a new system for my buddie's '91 Plymouth Laser.  We're doing a spider web theme and we want to mount the two Kicker amps in the back part of the rear hatch, suspended in a plexiglass spider web.  We want the web to be concave, or have a slight sag to it and wrap around the back wall of the trunk.  I'm thinking that we will use 3/8" plexi and rout out the web design.  I think I should build a jig under the plexi, in the same shape that we want the web to take.  I'm not sure if we should use a couple of propane torches, heat guns or an acceteline torch to heat the plexi?  Should we even be using plexi?  To keep the areas where the amps will be mounted flat, I think using two pieces of mdf screwed to the plexi (one on top, one on bottom like a sandwich) should keep those areas from warping.  Hope this isn't too overwhelming and any suggestions would be appreciated.  Not sure if we're going to leave the web clear, or we might sandblast it to give it a more realistic appearance.  We are also planning on illuminating it with LEDs. Thanks again!
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bellsracer
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Posted: May 03, 2007 at 7:48 AM - IP Logged  

LOL... Thank you very much in your confidence in me. A girl needs that once and a while (well at least from someone not her significant other ^-^ ). It has been a pleasure (still is) to offer my advice and information.

If you want to ask me for advice and don't want to post it on the forum, please do not hesitate to Private Message me.

Now down to business:
Heatin' it up: I prefer the oxy/acetaline torch with a rosebud on it. It burns through your fuel/air faster but it give you MUCH better control on the amount of heat and spreads it out better for a cleaner sag.

To Plexi or Not to Plexi, that is the question ^-^; Using plexi is pertectly fine. I'm partial to lexan or duraple for these applications since they retain more strength after forming. Heat will degrade plastic. Albeit just a little bit, I rather put as much strength as possible in my projects.

Hungry anyone? Sandwiching the plexi is exactly what I would do for this situation. I would be reluctant to use MDF for this purpose as it has a low burn tolerance (but you can still use it). I prefer plywood (or if available, a hardwood such as poplar) lined with 100% cotton. Use low pressure on the bolts/screws holding the sandwich together. Putting too much pressure on the plexi will warp them within the sandwich as the plastic is heated up and the heat spreads under the wood. Also do not forget to round off the wood. Use a large roundoff so when the plexi does its sag, there isn't a line or crease (sp?) on the surface. I recommend putting at least a 1/2" roundover on the edges of the "bread" wood.

Bright Idea: If you are planning to use LEDs to light up the web, do not forget to consider how/where your wiring will run to power the leds. If you don't mind me putting my two cents in, I would frost the plexi. The rough surface will catch the light better and color the web more. Sandblasting is a good way to get this effect, but also consider chemical or frost paint as it will not heat up the plexi and in my experience give a more even coverage.

Realism? hehe... this is more of just a personal observation here so you can ignore it if you like. I would have thought keeping it as perfectly clear as possible would be more realistic. Webs can't be seen until they are dirty, wet or seen through light right? So to me, keeping it clear is more realistic since you can't "see" it until you find an edge or some sort of stain/distortion on it.

Something else to consider: I haven't done this in plexi (only steel) but the shop owner has. Get a hold of a lot of plexi rods and fabricate the webs one strand at a time. The rounded rods will get rid of edges and look REALLY trick. Also, you will not need to heat a large area but just a section of rod to bend it and then weld them together. This will use less air/fuel too saving some money that way. In the end, the extra effort that you put into the project will definitely be noticed and turn more heads than using a cut flat sheet. This will also eat up a lot more time too, so in the end it is up to you how you want to go.

Ganbatte ne!


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Never send your ducks to eagle school.
The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra.
The 3Ls of life: Learn from the Past, Live for the Present, Look to the Future.
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mr.devil
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Posted: May 03, 2007 at 5:37 PM - IP Logged  

Wow! thanks for all the tips.  I wouldn't have thought about rounding off the edges, but now that you brought it up I guess it would leave a crease in the plexi when it sags.  It's all in the details!  We have an oxy/acetaline torch at my work place, but now that you mention it, the plexi rods would be much easier to heat and form in a jig.  When joining the web "strands" together, would they just melt into eachother, do you think they need to be "welded" together using an aditional piece?  Hope I'm not digging to deep, but I've not tried something like this before with plexi.  I've welded and soldered, but nothing with plastics.  My buddie, with the laser suggested frosting the web so that the illumination would be more visible.  I'll talk to him about all of this and see what he thinks, but I'm all for building the web from rods.  Thanks, so much for the advise and being so thorough.  I've been installing for the past fifteen years, some at shops, but mostly as a hobbie, and you've showed me that I've still got alot to learn!  Lol!
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bellsracer
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Posted: May 03, 2007 at 11:49 PM - IP Logged  

The rods will melt together and weld, but remember they have a very low melting temperature and it happens FAST, so I would stress that you practice on some extra scraps or something. Use a 00 tip to focus the heat properly and keep the temperature low. Filler will most likely be needed since this is the first time you are plasti-welding. But then again, if you can pick it up quickly, then you may not need it.

Well I don't have the experience you do (I've ony been an installer for a couple of years now and started fabricating only a year ago) but that is why I love Don (the owner). He's only 25, but if you can dream it, he can probably do it. He's a bit of a perfectionist so it's a good thing that most of our customers are patient. But they get what they pay for. What really is shocking (and sometimes annoying) is that he knows so much. While out with his mother one time she told me of a time when he spent a day drinking all the juice and milk cartons just so he could have materials to build a weather station in the back yard. She said soon after, he got better at predicting the weather than the ones on tv. ROFL.

In short, I am just a messenger girl. Give most of the information credit to him. I have a few original ideas of my own and my own techniques but no matter what project I am on, I always end up going to him or our tech guy for help.

As for me, let's just say I'm over 21 but not 30. Xp


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Never send your ducks to eagle school.
The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra.
The 3Ls of life: Learn from the Past, Live for the Present, Look to the Future.
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mr.devil
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Posted: May 04, 2007 at 3:42 PM - IP Logged  

Well, thank you for the tips and info again.  I have only been "glassing" for about four years now and only when a friend wants an install or when I decide to redo my own system.  I've worked part time at a few shops, but they don't seem to last more than a few years down here in the sunshine state.  Now I do everything out of my own garage which has more tools and equipment than most shops around here.  It sucks wanting to be creative and try new ideas, but not having the cars to do it with.  That's why I jump at the chance to install whatever in whatever.  The guy with the Laser that I'm working on is a rep for Kicker, Diamond and a few other brands.  The whole set up is going to be Kicker, with two L5 12s facing back, with the ports facing forward just over the top of the rear seat.  He is getting the car repainted, then we will start on the install.  I urged him to wait until we got the entire system done but he says that he must have it painted now.  I figured that if he wants to paint anything that we glass the same color, then it could be shot then, oh well.  Anyways, I'll post some pics when we get started, probley wont be until the end of this month.  Thanks again for all of your advise, and I'll probey have more questions in the future.
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