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my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150


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KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,527
Platinum spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 29, 2009 at 10:05 PM / IP Logged  

I recently purchased a new vehicle - a 2005 Ford F150 (extended cab, 8' bed work truck).  Two of the things I couldn't handle on the new truck was no door locks and no remote start.  So, after having the vehicle for about 4 days I went to my local shop (Car Stereo One) and got hooked up with a Clifford 50.7x and 3 actuators (each door and tailgate).

I didn't get a security bypass, I figured who needs one.  This oversite cost me a few days because I ended up ordering one off of Ebay.  Not a huge deal, I'm a busy guy and knew this entire install would be spread out over several days with limited pockets of time to work on the vechicle (I have a 5 month old daughter).

Before I get to the install let me give a bit of background on myself and my skill level.  I have a bachelors of science in technology degree (majored in electronics and computer technology) and while I was in college I was a full time installer for 3-4 years at several different Circuit Cities (depending on what city I was in at the time).  I can safely say that pretty much everything I know came from CC training - so keep that in mind as you review my work!  I performed this entire install in my driveway at my house (the truck won't fit in my garage).  My garage, however, is probably better equipped tool wise then most install bays (60 gallon industrial air compressor, air tools, power tools, Fluke meters, ocilloscope, soldering irons, hand tools, drop lights, drop plugs, drop air lines, etc).  Here are a few of the main tools used

(this is for Howie)Bed of Nails meter probe attached to my Fluke 189 meter (Rigid cordless drill in the back):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

DEI Bitwriter (borrowed from shop):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Grommet Poker (for putting holes in OEM grommets):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Soldering gun (for big wires):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Butane soldering iron (for smaller stuff):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

My most important "skill" used throughout this install is my technique for stripping bigger wires.  First, I cut in to the insulate like I'm going to strip the wire.  I then release the strippers and cut in the insulatation again about 3/8" away from the first incision (look at the brown wire):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Then, with the pliars on the end of my strippers, I remove the insulation slug by pulling gently on it - make sure you don't grip the actual copper wire because it will break if you are not careful.  If you do it right you will have this:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

The next important step is to prep the brain thoroughly.  I like to find ALL the wires in the vehicle and then I can accurately group (and twist) my wires together in a manner that leaves a clean install.  Here is what I started with:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

By the time I eliminated unneeded wires and grouped necesarry wires together this is what I had:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

I then taped up the looms and unused wires.  I, personally, like to cut and leave the unused wires in the car instead of ripping them out - that way if I want to add something down the road I don't have to worry about fitting wires back in the harness.  Here is the alarm fully prepped:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Kevin Pierson
KPierson 
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Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 29, 2009 at 10:17 PM / IP Logged  

I actually started with adding the door lock actuators.  I figured the tailgate would be the hardest, so I started there first.  It turns out it wasn't too bad.  The only thing that caused me a little issue is the fact that my tailgate is removable and I didn't want the actuator wires to make it difficult to install.  To remedy that situation I ordered a weatherproof two pin trailer plug from Del City (about $2). 

I first removed the liner on the inside of the tailgate to expose the locking mechanism:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Squeezing the actuator in wasn't easy because of limited room and I wasn't able to get a good shot of it, but you can see the screws that hold it in place:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

I then soldered some LONG wire to the actuator - remember it's an 8 foot bed and then an extended cab to get through:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Next, I routed the wires out the bottom of the tailgate:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Then, I cut the wire and soldered in the plug:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

To get the wire to the front of the vehicle I drilled a hole in the back of the vehicle right above the bumper near where the wire came out of the tailgate.  After I drilled the hole I sprayed it with some beige spray paint (didn't have white):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

With the hole drilled and painted (to prevent rust) I added a plastic grommet for protection:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

I then loomed, taped, and tucked the plug:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Now to the doors!

The doors were pretty basic, pull the panels off, mount the actuators inline with the lock rod, and route the wires as OEM as possible through the OEM wire tubing in to the cabin.

Actuator mounted and connected to lock rod.  The actuator is on the back side of the door skin, but you can again see the mounting screws to get an idea of where it is:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Wire twisted and routed through door (green and blue twisted wires):my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

The passenger side was very similar so I won't detail it.  When I got all the actuators installed and tested (using the battery in my drill to lock and unlock them) I routed all the wires to the drivers kick panel and tucked them away for a few days until I could get back on the project.

Kevin Pierson
howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
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Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 1:00 AM / IP Logged  

I take the point about the bed of nails, except yesterday I had the DEI tech manager with me  and he also used my method of a snap-on test light* with a Stanley knife on the end. I agree about hole painting, except hood switches, I spray hole and switch with lithium base. Also RTV the grommet to seal it .I still can't see the point of twisting the wiring but again I agree about not cutting off unused cables.

The not too amazing fact is that if you looked at my tools on an install, there wouldn't be much difference except for the brands used, i.e. Weller Gun and Pyropen.

*Don't recommend this method over using a DMM but I'm old school and have my own safety procedures.

KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,527
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Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 5:25 AM / IP Logged  

To each his own - I'm sure there are several different ways to test wires that are effective and clean.  I've had the nails for years and I couldn't give them up at this point!

I do need to go back and seal my grommets - I have a lot more documentaiton to post, I got too tired last night, I'll try to get the rest up today.

Kevin Pierson
soundnsecurity 
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Joined: November 10, 2008
Location: Louisiana, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 8:15 AM / IP Logged  
proof that not everything that came out of circuit city is trash. nice work so far but i have some advice for you, your ignition harness would come out A LOT cleaner if you didn't twist your heavy gauge wires together. if you twist them then its obvious that they arent factory.
howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
Pot Metal spacespace
Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 10:06 AM / IP Logged  
In Kevin's defense, he didn't twist the heavy guage stuff.  I know we've all been here before but the only 2 reasons I can think of for twisting cable are as an anti-static aid on demolition wires and low voltage low current such as CAN and speaker wiring.
KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,527
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Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 12:25 PM / IP Logged  

The igntiion wires were twisted - they came out looking pretty factory after they were taped and loomed.  Pictures later!

On the actuator wires twisting them does make them easier to run - the actuator wires from the back were 20'+ ran down along the frame of the truck (next to an OEM loom).  Everything else, as I mentioned, was just for fun.  It is redundent to twist AND tape, but that is what I did.

Kevin Pierson
joch1314 
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Joined: March 25, 2008
Location: Texas, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 12:36 PM / IP Logged  

Nice clean work on the taligate.  Looks good....Is that a Nissan/Infinity vehicle in the background there?  Can't make it out but that's what my guess goes too!  Howie, you may want to look again....the heavy gauge wires are twisted.  I personally don't twist any of my wires, (tape and zip ties), but nonetheless, it'll still look real clean when it's all said and done, twisted or not.  Nice Work Kevin!!

...half of the truth can be worse than a lie. <----Roger Russell said that..
KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,527
Platinum spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 2:30 PM / IP Logged  
joch1314 wrote:

Nice clean work on the taligate.  Looks good....Is that a Nissan/Infinity vehicle in the background there?  Can't make it out but that's what my guess goes too!  Howie, you may want to look again....the heavy gauge wires are twisted.  I personally don't twist any of my wires, (tape and zip ties), but nonetheless, it'll still look real clean when it's all said and done, twisted or not.  Nice Work Kevin!!

Yep, that's my toy in the background - a 2004 Infiniti G35 - built motor, twin turbo.  500hp of Japanese fun!  I bought it new back in '03 and it only has 21k on it - I need to get it out more!

Kevin Pierson
KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,527
Platinum spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: July 30, 2009 at 2:38 PM / IP Logged  

Alright, back to the install.

With the door locks done and the alarm prepped I moved on to mounting the siren and doing all the "under hood" work (siren, hood pin, and tach). 

There was a nice open spot on the drivers fender for the siren so I used two self tapping screws to secure it:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

I then routed my tach and hood pin wires from inside the truck through the grommet and then pulled back my siren wire (I had never done it this way, in the past I pulled the siren wire forward).  It was a bit more difficult to pull wires in opposite directions, but I decided to follow DEIs recomendations and actually ground the siren inside the vehicle.  In the past I have grounded sirens to the mounting plate and in the past I have had grounding issues.

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

I connected the tach to the fuel injector closest to the OEM grommet (that I poked a hole through with my grommet poker) and then proceeded to the hood pin.  I, for some reason still unknown, used the hood pin supplied by DEI.  In my own experiance I know they don't last and they only cause problems, but I installed it anyway.  In the future I want to replace it with a magnetic switch, but this will have to do for now.  I solered the wire directly to the pin switch instead of using the supplied crimp connector and I covered the exposed metal with a synthetic grease - we'll see how it works:

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

Finally, all I had left was the loom (you can see the tach wire taped coming out of the added loom in the top pic):

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

my rs / alarm 2005 ford f150 -- posted image.

With that done, all I had left was to connect everything to the brain!

Kevin Pierson
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