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Repairing a subwoofer


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ksw870 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 10:55 AM / IP Logged  
Is it possible to repair a subwoofer if the cone has a hole in it? I got a pretty good deal on a Audiobahn AW1008Q with an aluminum cone, but the cone has a little slash or something in it. Is their anything I can use to repair it?
Asmodeus 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 12:23 PM / IP Logged  

If its in the actual cone and not the surround....Then I would use JB Weld....or something comparible...

Chack and make sure thats the only damage and make sure the spider is ok.....But JB weld should fix the CONE....

Repairing a subwoofer -- posted image.
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ksw870 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 12:27 PM / IP Logged  
the guy said that his dog hit his desk and knocked a letter opener off his desk and puntcured a hole in the cone. And thats all. So I should just take some JB weld and put it over the hole?
oonikfraleyoo 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 2:14 PM / IP Logged  
A falling letter opener punched a whole in aluminum? I dunno but JB weld should fix it. It will look like arse but it won't sound any worse than it did before it had the hole. You can mount it inverted to hide the hole and show off those nice chrome flames.
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Poormanq45 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 7:58 PM / IP Logged  
it is extremely hard to PROPERLY repair a punctured cone. What ever you use to repair the cone is going to add weight to that one spot which will cause an imbalance in the weight distribution of the cone. If the difference is great enough, you will run into linearity issues which will cause distortion.
ksw870 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 9:33 PM / IP Logged  

is it possible to buy one of their really cheap 10's with a aluminum cone and replace it?

and what kind of box would i need to mount it inverted? It's got like a triple stack magnet on it or somthing and i'm pretty sure most boxes wont have the mounting depth for that

deocder 
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Joined: December 27, 2004
Posted: March 06, 2005 at 9:47 PM / IP Logged  
I'm pretty sure that the cone protects the motor assembly only. Therefore, I would leave it alone so as to not add any weight to the structure. You could have the cone replaced.
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Hornshockey 
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Posted: March 06, 2005 at 11:00 PM / IP Logged  
deocder, the cone is what the sub uses to make all of its sound.  It uses the cone to change the air pressure surrounding it and the total air pressure in the enclosure it's in.  With a hole in the cone, the sub will not be properly sealed in the box and you will get more distortion, due to the volume of air passing through that small hole interfering with the air outside the box that the cone has moved.  In other words, it will sound like a$$.  Poorman is correct, cones are balanced to distribute all the foces evenly on the coil.  Adding weight to one spot could throw off the balance slightly.  The closer the hole is to the center the better off you will be, the effect would be similar to a weight on the end of a short pole as opposed to a long one, you will get less flex and thus less distortion with the added weight from the repair closer to the center.
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Poormanq45 
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Posted: March 07, 2005 at 3:43 PM / IP Logged  
Hornshockey wrote:
The closer the hole is to the center the better off you will be, the effect would be similar to a weight on the end of a short pole as opposed to a long one, you will get less flex and thus less distortion with the added weight from the repair closer to the center.
What you're saying is correct, but if the hole is indeed near the center of the cone, then more then likely there is a dent or hole in the voice coil. He said that a letter opener went through it. IIRC, letter openers are kind of sharp . So then it probably would have punctured the voice coil too Repairing a subwoofer -- posted image.
ksw870 
Member - Posts: 33
Member spacespace
Joined: March 06, 2005
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