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surfboard style glassing


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realitycheck 
Silver - Posts: 751
Silver spacespace
Joined: September 09, 2004
Posted: February 22, 2006 at 3:29 PM / IP Logged  
Hey guys I have a question. Twice now on tv I have seen people creating surfboards. When they are glassing the foam they use a sqeegee like thing to apply the resin to the board and smooth out the glass and all that. Have you guys ever tried this on speaker boxes?? How well does it work?   I see lots of advantages to this way of glassing if it works right.
Learning the trade one fiberglass creation at a time!
torquehead 
Copper - Posts: 144
Copper spacespace
Joined: January 15, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: February 22, 2006 at 8:51 PM / IP Logged  

Yeah, alot of RC airplane/rocket/boat/ect. modelers use this too, keeping excessive resin to a minimum for weight reduction.  I used to do it for all my FG fabrications, found the process a waste of time actually.  I do however use a roller when I using FG just keep out the air bubbles during layup, which IMO is a must because alot of customer's requests have been overkill.  I dont want MY work to fall apart.  Answer (my 2cents): I used to use that process, now I cover everthing liberally and just use a roller, alot of resin is not a bad thing as long as there are no air pockets/bubbles.  If you need to fabricate thin, single layer, not so rigid components such as tweeter pods on an A pillar, sure, keep it thin and simple in places where no loads are exerted. 

Anyone else with other opinions or experiences?

Velocity Motors 
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Joined: March 08, 2002
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posted: February 22, 2006 at 9:14 PM / IP Logged  
I use a fiberglass roller that smooths out the glass and also squeezes the resin through the matting effectively using the resin on the matting.
Jeff
Velocity Custom Home Theater
Mobile Audio/Video Specialist
Morden, Manitoba CANADA
realitycheck 
Silver - Posts: 751
Silver spacespace
Joined: September 09, 2004
Posted: February 23, 2006 at 8:24 AM / IP Logged  
Yeah I tried a roller a while back but I just couldnt get it too work out very well for me. Maybe I wasnt doing it right or something. I dont know how thats possible, but it just didnt work for me. Essentially I was wondering if this process would cause the fiberglass to be extremely smooth once your done glassing. So there would be a whole lot less sanding involved. Thats what im looking for less waves smoother surface, less sanding. What you guys think?
Learning the trade one fiberglass creation at a time!
torquehead 
Copper - Posts: 144
Copper spacespace
Joined: January 15, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: February 23, 2006 at 9:08 PM / IP Logged  

Heres something to think about when using a roller.  Lets say, you have a section of something covered with foil/tape (im sure you know the begining process), and you brush down a decent layer of resin, then (if the plot is flat) lay a sheet of woven FG down, (if the plot is very curvy, use ripped up pieces of FG mat).  After the sheet or mat is layed down on the resin, use the roller to press the FG down into the resin which ends up the the desired result that you already know.  This keeps the roller out of resin as much as possible.  After that is simi-cured, you can start this all over and over until the disired thickness.  I guess if you plan this right, it will help save on resin.  Maybe you already knew this, just thought I would explain.  Being you want flat wave free surfaces, do remember that when you have a flat surface that needs to be created, you should use MDF instead.  Use FG to fabricate, make contoured pieces, or recreate whats already existing, ect.

Most of my sanding has only been because I needed to scuff the surface before applying body filler or RageGold.  As far as using a surfboard process....I dont think I would be so detailed, because we are not trying to create a surfboard, except as stated before, when making small A-pillar pods or something that dont need so much support.  ADD kicked in tell me if I talked too much. LOL

realitycheck 
Silver - Posts: 751
Silver spacespace
Joined: September 09, 2004
Posted: February 24, 2006 at 7:55 AM / IP Logged  
Nah, thanks though man. I appreciate it. I was just talking about when I fiberglass I usually get alot of bumps and stuff I have to sand down, and I was wondering if that would eliminate the bumps. I think your talking about the same thing when you said you had to sand it to put your rage gold on. Thats the parts im talking about those bumps your sanding.
Learning the trade one fiberglass creation at a time!

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