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box will it leak?


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koolauto 
Member - Posts: 20
Member spacespace
Joined: September 22, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 20, 2006 at 11:12 PM / IP Logged  
just working on my first sub box, holds two  tens and i sunk the amp in the center,at a angle, all out of 3/4  mdf  but..i noticed inside the box were the amp rack is theres a almost a 1/4 gap  top is pretty tight  should i bondo this up or fill with a wedge of mdf .. thanks
snotdobbs 
Copper - Posts: 148
Copper spacespace
Joined: September 11, 2003
Location: United States
Posted: November 20, 2006 at 11:36 PM / IP Logged  
pl 400  or some serious caulk hahahah i said caulk
master5 
Silver - Posts: 1,123
Silver spacespace
Joined: October 10, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 20, 2006 at 11:45 PM / IP Logged  

A 1/4'' gap is pretty severe. Did you cut the wood with a handsaw?  Jk..lol

I would not recomend bondo for fear of cracking ...which bondo is famous for doing. It is meant for filling very fine areas and then be sanded to almost non exsistance but it is not very good for load bearing. I have seen hunks of it fall off cars when used in any thickness as well as other structures develop cracks over time.

I never had to deal with a gap that large in an enclosure but no matter what anyone reccomends to use to seal it..2 more will say it's wrong..or will damage the surround (fumes) or will blow out. But regardless I will tell you my opinions.

1) resin and fiberglass matting and/ or,

2) clear silicone and/or,

3) liquid nails

Now if you believe as some others do that the vapors will damage the sub allow whatever you use to seal it up to dry for a couple of days or until the odor is weak.

If you are really concerned about the fumes I have used the following technique for cosmetic repairs but it "might" help seal as well.

Take a bunch of MDF "sawdust" and mix it with elmers wood glue. Mix it together until it is a thick but moldable "wood cement" or pastelike consitency and pack that into the gap from the inside out....allow to dry and sand smooth. repete if nessecary. If done properly you won't ever notice the gap and it should be a permenent fix. As a bonus no fumes and any mess will wash up with water.

koolauto 
Member - Posts: 20
Member spacespace
Joined: September 22, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 20, 2006 at 11:50 PM / IP Logged  
the gap is tight at the top ,just the underneath  has the gap.
master5 
Silver - Posts: 1,123
Silver spacespace
Joined: October 10, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 21, 2006 at 12:07 AM / IP Logged  

I don't fully understand the relationship between "the top" and "underneath" but either way if you fear a leak you are probably correct.

Use any procedure posted to correct it and all should be splendid.

sprawl85 
Copper - Posts: 204
Copper spacespace
Joined: March 15, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 21, 2006 at 2:26 AM / IP Logged  
a 1/4" isn't that much space to fill.  Well it IS a pretty big mistake, BUT that still isn't that big.  Liquid nails would do an excellent job, and it hardens like concrete.  Ease of working with and availability would make it my first choice.  Silicone caulk... well it might blow out depending on sub pressure, I guess it really depends on how much pressure.  Fiberglass is way too much work to remedy the situation.  Screwing in an mdf piece and then caulking around it or something would work fine too. 
fiberglass reminds me of peanut brittle... but fiberglass tastes better!
master5 
Silver - Posts: 1,123
Silver spacespace
Joined: October 10, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 21, 2006 at 6:05 PM / IP Logged  

Agreed w/ sprawl as well. But I don't think mixing a few drops of liquid hardener into some resin, dipping a few pieces of matting in it and applying it along the gap actually constitutes "way too much work"... but then again I guess some people would think that getting out of bed is way too much work..lol

But yeah, I see no reason why liquid nails wouldn't work..but I bet someone out there will disagree. You know what they say about opinions..lol..although I base what I post from experience it still seems to make no difference at times. But I am from the philosophy that if it works for you, it's all good.

sprawl85 
Copper - Posts: 204
Copper spacespace
Joined: March 15, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 22, 2006 at 10:07 AM / IP Logged  

yeah the too much work about the resin and matting was me when I was drunk and just got done working on some kick pods.  So i wasn't really feelin the fiberglass at the moment.  hehe

fiberglass reminds me of peanut brittle... but fiberglass tastes better!
master5 
Silver - Posts: 1,123
Silver spacespace
Joined: October 10, 2006
Location: United States
Posted: November 22, 2006 at 2:55 PM / IP Logged  

I've done some PWI's (posting while intoxicated) myself and I once told someone on a reply that leds were rated in farads..lol , so been there. But regardless I never need an excuse to fiberglass..I like the smell too much (and also like that it bothers everyone else)


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