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re se12 enclosure


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slipitysmooth 
Member - Posts: 24
Member spacespace
Joined: November 24, 2003
Posted: March 22, 2008 at 9:37 PM / IP Logged  
Well I started building my ported box for a RE SE12, and just had two quick questions...
1) Is the one brace at the bottom, and one more that will go directly above it against the top of the box...enough?
2) Do I need to caulk inside the port walls? If so, whats the best method, especially after I throw the top board on and need to do the top seems...
Heres a few pics of the progress and to help with the questions...
re se12 enclosure -- posted image.
re se12 enclosure -- posted image.
Any other critiques, comments, or suggestions, would be great...first box so Im all ears.
whiterob 
Copper - Posts: 351
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Joined: July 22, 2007
Location: United States
Posted: March 22, 2008 at 11:19 PM / IP Logged  
You can never have too much bracing so if you are ever wondering about the strength just add more. As long as you still have enough volume you should add more. If I was going to be really critical I would say to have the bracing moved on the bottom. I would have it running in the middle of the wood because that is where it is going to need it the most. The wood that is furthest from a side is going to need the bracing the most to prevent flexing.
One thing I would recommend is to sand down the end of the port. This will help reduce some air turbulance.
You don't need to seal the port. If the joints are tight your port should be good.
Overall the box looks good. Looks like you did a good job on all the cuts and everything.
stevdart 
Platinum - Posts: 5,816
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Posted: March 23, 2008 at 10:02 AM / IP Logged  

Because of the use of a corner brace inside the port, if you were to look at the port result as a straight line it would look something like this:

re se12 enclosure -- posted image.

I'm not sure if I could explain what that type of constriction in the port diameter would do to the port function, but that kind of design should be avoided.  While you now have everything glued into place, it doesn't look like there's a fix that you could do for it.  The use of the corner brace is very good, but the opposing corner should have been cut so that it follows the same angled turn.

I agree with the above post on the subject of bracing.  You should incorporate a solid baffle with cutout type of brace in the center of the box.  It is a solid piece of MDF that is sized to exactly fit front-to-back and top-to-bottom, a large center hole cut out, and glued into place.  It looks like this type:

re se12 enclosure -- posted image.

In looking at the pic, I don't see the results of excess glue removal at the seams nor along the seam of the double baffled face panel.  It appears like glue might have been used sparingly.  We should be able to see the glue excess pushed out along the seams (or the result of sanding / scraping off the excess).  If the front panels are not securely bonded to each other with glue, make sure you pull them tight to each other with screws before you cap off the project.  You could also add another corner brace to the far back corner.

Use plenty of glue before you put the lid on it.  If you see excess glue pushed out along the entire lengths of outside seams when you clamp it you can be satisfied that the top will not need additional caulking on the inside seams.  The center cutout brace can be glued and installed at the same time you install the top.  Before that, caulk every seam you have access to now.

Be sure to paint the inside of the visible part of the port before you cap off the box.  All in all, it looks like you are doing a very good job with it.

Build the box so that it performs well in the worst case scenario and, in return, it will reward you at all times.
slipitysmooth 
Member - Posts: 24
Member spacespace
Joined: November 24, 2003
Posted: March 23, 2008 at 10:14 AM / IP Logged  
thanks for the help...i actually planned to notch out to inside of the port on the corner to compensate for the brace. However, due to time constraints in the wood shop i was at, and just simply forgetting too, that didn't get done. I have everything caulked that i can get to now...Im gonna look into seeing if i can make that other baffle to put in there for bracing.
sedate 
Silver - Posts: 1,173
Silver spacespace
Joined: July 03, 2004
Location: Colorado, United States
Posted: March 23, 2008 at 10:59 AM / IP Logged  

whiterob wrote:
You can never have too much bracing so if you are ever wondering about the strength just add more. As long as you still have enough volume you should add more.

stevdart wrote:
I agree with the above post on the subject of bracing. 

I disagree.

From a sonic perspective, I suppose this is not incorrect, however, taking into account the entire vehicular situation, I think this is poor installation design.  Unless the install is of the most *extreme* variety, bracing a box made of 3/4 MDF isn't going ever going to produce any sonically detectable differences.

3/4 MDF weights ALOT - and this thing is supposed to go into a CAR - it has to move around and be filled with >$3.50/gallon fuel.  Adding MORE weight on top of what is already a 3/4 MDF box is WAY past the point of dimishing returns - especially for any type of install that actually goes into a vehicle. At this point you are just slowing down ur car and using ever more unleaded - in these times, I think these are critical considerations!

Indeed - I actually think 3/4 MDF tends to be a waste of resources, but without getting into all that - I always build 1/2 MDF boxes with a coat or three of fiberglass resin on the inside - saving some ~40-50% mass and considerable external dimensions over a traditional 3/4 MDF box of identical volume.

If one absolutely insisted on bracing a box however - 

stevdart wrote:
You should incorporate a solid baffle with cutout type of brace in the center of the box.  It is a solid piece of MDF that is sized to exactly fit front-to-back and top-to-bottom, a large center hole cut out, and glued into place.

I do agree that this is, certainly, the best possible way to do it - the arch is an insanly strong shape. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arch

The realities of vehicles being what they are however,

whiterob wrote:
As long as you still have enough volume you should add more.

Sadly, no box I've EVER designed to actually fit inside a trunk has "enough" volume. re se12 enclosure -- posted image.

"I'm finished!" - Daniel Plainview
slipitysmooth 
Member - Posts: 24
Member spacespace
Joined: November 24, 2003
Posted: March 24, 2008 at 6:16 PM / IP Logged  
Well...got the top board ready to go on, predrilled all the holes and countersunk (Big pita with just a regular bit). Tossed on some glue..
re se12 enclosure -- posted image.
then secured the top...maybe a few to many screws, but oh well.
re se12 enclosure -- posted image.
All that is left to do is cut the subwoofer hole, and the hole in the back for the terminal cup.
Only thing that is physically wrong with it, is the back board is about 1/16 from flush...messed up one cut, causing that. Not a huge deal, since its the back and I'm gonna have it carpeted.
On a side note, is there any reason why a lighted rocker switch rated 10A at 120 Vac, wont illuminate when in line for the remote wire in a car. I could have sworn this is the same switch I used in my old car, but I can't get this one to light up...
stevdart 
Platinum - Posts: 5,816
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Posted: March 24, 2008 at 6:58 PM / IP Logged  

What...did you say 120 volts AC?  How 'bout using a 12 V DC switch?

With that baffle misalignment, if it were me:  carpet will not hide the defect, but in fact will call even more attention to it.  Is the back panel jutting out 1/16" at all four sides?  Use strips of stock MDF and glue around the perimeter (make the 3/4" stock strips thick enough to be able to measure and cut...for example 3/4" X 3/4"). The strips will extend out past the misaligned back panel.  Carpet the back inset separately.  The rest of the box carpet would wrap around the new back edges and terminate at the carpeted inset.  Or it may be easier to carpet it in reverse of how I explained it, with the back panel inset being last.  Say that's how you designed it...it would be believable.

Build the box so that it performs well in the worst case scenario and, in return, it will reward you at all times.
slipitysmooth 
Member - Posts: 24
Member spacespace
Joined: November 24, 2003
Posted: March 24, 2008 at 7:32 PM / IP Logged  
radio shack didn't have any DC switches in the small store we have local...
Also, the baffle is just coming out a tiny bit at the top, i think when i glued the back it shifted when i put the first screw in, didn't notice it until it was to late...I think I will sand the top edge smooth when i get back in the wood shop. we'll see how it goes, if its not perfect, I'm ok with it, because it was my first shot at this and all.
tubbs04 
Copper - Posts: 212
Copper spacespace
Joined: March 31, 2007
Location: United States
Posted: March 24, 2008 at 8:19 PM / IP Logged  
your always going to learn something everytime you build.. the project looks great! I would have loved to see that brace in the port magically disapeer, but I understand sometimes you can't unbuild.. lol... anyways thanks for posting
...don't crush the weasel...

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