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fiberglass enclosure body filler with res


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shatteredk 
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Joined: September 20, 2009
Location: Minnesota, United States
Posted: September 20, 2009 at 3:21 PM / IP Logged  
Alright, I was wondering if I should mix body filler with fiberglass resin, or just use only body filler for the sub enclosure? I've finish sanding down the fiberglass just wondering if adding the resin adds more strength to the box. I'm putting 2 s15l7s so I need it to be strong as possible.
d_rock_81 
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Joined: June 09, 2009
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Posted: September 21, 2009 at 2:59 AM / IP Logged  
i've never done it, but i don't believe it will make it any stronger, it just thins out the body filler so less sanding is needed i believe. but don't quote me on this.
Dustin Rockney
Rockstar Autosports
tjamz 
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Posted: December 15, 2009 at 11:24 AM / IP Logged  
Basically this is what is called a "milk shake" where you mix resin & filler together until they get to the consistency of a milk shake. Then add the appropriate amounts of hardener for each. In my experiences it seems that this provides a material that can be brushed on and provides more strength than filler alone does AND seems to stick to the box better (less likelihood of flaking off during the sanding process). And since it goes on in a semi-liquid state, it seeps into cracks well and provides a nice smooth(er) finish. I often use the milkshake method on the inside seems of the box as well to fill any gaps that may exist between the form and the baffle board.
Now, I'm not advocating using filler to provide any sort of strength, but rather to enhance existing structurally sound enclosures/panels/etc.
ckeeler 
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Posted: December 15, 2009 at 11:34 AM / IP Logged  
dont use body filler to make thing stronger. why oh why does everybody do this these days? a properly built fiberglass enclosure will only need very little body filler at all if any on it. a little here and a little there to correct some curves or such (and not for any type of strength at all) and thats it! if you need to make your enclosure stronger.....USE MORE MATTING AND RESIN! sheesh.....fiberglass enclosure body filler with res -- posted image.
tjamz 
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Posted: December 15, 2009 at 11:48 AM / IP Logged  
ckeeler wrote:
dont use body filler to make thing stronger. why oh why does everybody do this these days? a properly built fiberglass enclosure will only need very little body filler at all if any on it. a little here and a little there to correct some curves or such (and not for any type of strength at all) and thats it! if you need to make your enclosure stronger.....USE MORE MATTING AND RESIN! sheesh.....fiberglass enclosure body filler with res -- posted image.
I'm not sure if that was directed at me, but just in case...
Isn't that kind of what I said, especially with the disclaimer line at the bottom?
tjamz wrote:
Now, I'm not advocating using filler to provide any sort of strength, but rather to enhance existing structurally sound enclosures/panels/etc.
It doesn't change the fact that a milkshake concoction is structurally stronger than just body filler alone...and goes on smoother, etc, etc, etc...
ckeeler 
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Posted: December 15, 2009 at 12:02 PM / IP Logged  
thats to the OP. as for the "milkshake method", its not needed either if you just take some time to do things a little different in the begining, and you can have a much nicer product in much less time, with WAY LESS sanding too, but what ever,  to each his own. what do I know anyway? I've only been doing this stuff since the dark ages, lol.
tjamz 
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Posted: December 15, 2009 at 12:14 PM / IP Logged  
ckeeler wrote:
thats to the OP. as for the "milkshake method", its not needed either if you just take some time to do things a little different in the begining, and you can have a much nicer product in much less time, with WAY LESS sanding too, but what ever,  to each his own. what do I know anyway? I've only been doing this stuff since the dark ages, lol.
Oh, I hear ya and I'm certainly not disagreeing. My response was to the OP as well as it seemed like he had to do some filling anyway based on his post.
As for the dark ages, I feel you. I've been installing professionally for about 16.5 years and was a DIY installer since about '88. Now, I know I'm not the oldest/most experienced guy on here, but it's fair to say that I've been installing longer than a lot of my customers have been alive.
berzina123 
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Joined: December 16, 2009
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Posted: December 16, 2009 at 1:07 AM / IP Logged  
this is what is called a "milk shake" where you mix resin & filler together until they get to the consistency of a milk shake. Then add the appropriate amounts of hardener for each. In my experiences it seems that this provides a material that can be brushed on and provides more strength than filler alone does AND seems to stick to the box better (less likelihood of flaking off during the sanding process).

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