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negative to positive inverter


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phil6710 
Copper - Posts: 89
Copper spacespace
Joined: September 04, 2009
Location: New York, United States
Posted: February 16, 2011 at 10:15 PM / IP Logged  
I would like to make my own door lock - to + inverter. For installs on keyless entry units on vehicals like GM and some Dodges. I have taken the inverter modules apart and they seem pretty simple. But I would like to know what parts I would need and how to wire it up. Thaks.
Solartech Window Tinting and Electronics,contract installer
KarTuneMan 
Platinum - Posts: 7,056
Platinum spaceThis member has made a donation to the12volt.com. Click here for more info.spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: December 14, 2004
Location: Isle Of Man
Posted: February 16, 2011 at 10:33 PM / IP Logged  
A relay..... ?
Ween 
Platinum - Posts: 1,302
Platinum spacespace
Joined: August 01, 2004
Location: Illinois, United States
Posted: February 16, 2011 at 10:51 PM / IP Logged  
i'm guessing he's referring to the ones with the transistors in them. googling 'transistor circuits' should give a few choices with tutorials.
mark
phil6710 
Copper - Posts: 89
Copper spacespace
Joined: September 04, 2009
Location: New York, United States
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 12:50 AM / IP Logged  
Yes I know I could use 2 relays but I would like to it with transistors and I think a rectifier dioed.
Solartech Window Tinting and Electronics,contract installer
howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
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Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 6:10 AM / IP Logged  
Done both, relays tend to be more reliable, but either Oldspark or Mr. Idiot can help with the circuitry, PNP power transistor + 47Kohm resistor + a diode.
Mike M2 
Platinum - Posts: 2,652
Platinum spacespace
Joined: June 29, 2005
Location: United States
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 6:25 AM / IP Logged  
I can't see the point. A DEI 451M is designed to do this exact same thing...
Mike M2
Tech Manager
CS Dealer Services
howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
Pot Metal spacespace
Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 7:46 AM / IP Logged  
If it's a cost factor I go to Radio Spares (= Farnel or Mouser in the US) I buy "mini" or PCB relays, diode them, wire them up as DEI 8616 and the cost is about 1/3 the DEI product less my time though I make up about 10 at a time.
KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,526
Platinum spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 9:04 AM / IP Logged  
I would run a 470 ohm resistor in to the base of a PNP transistor (like a 2n3906). The other end of the 470 ohm resistor would be your (-) input.
I would connect the emitter to 12vdc
I would connect the collector to a 22 ohm resistor. The other end of the 22 ohm resistor is your (+) output.
I would connect a diode between the (+) output and ground.
The 470 ohm resistor provides your base current. The 22 ohm resistor protects the output from excessive current that can damage the transistor. The diode protects the transistor from reverse voltage spikes caused by the collapsing of magnetic fields most commonly found in relays.
Kevin Pierson
KarTuneMan 
Platinum - Posts: 7,056
Platinum spaceThis member has made a donation to the12volt.com. Click here for more info.spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: December 14, 2004
Location: Isle Of Man
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 10:49 AM / IP Logged  

KPierson wrote:
I would run a 470 ohm resistor in to the base of a PNP transistor (like a 2n3906). The other end of the 470 ohm resistor would be your (-) input.
I would connect the emitter to 12vdc
I would connect the collector to a 22 ohm resistor. The other end of the 22 ohm resistor is your (+) output.
I would connect a diode between the (+) output and ground.
The 470 ohm resistor provides your base current. The 22 ohm resistor protects the output from excessive current that can damage the transistor. The diode protects the transistor from reverse voltage spikes caused by the collapsing of magnetic fields most commonly found in relays.

contract installer..... what is your time worth?

Ween 
Platinum - Posts: 1,302
Platinum spacespace
Joined: August 01, 2004
Location: Illinois, United States
Posted: February 17, 2011 at 1:51 PM / IP Logged  
but the transistor is elegant, and the relay, brute force.  learning can be fun for the one who tries. 
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