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newbie, connector or solder?


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howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
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Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: August 05, 2014 at 2:04 AM / IP Logged  
For ease of accessibility I would go for crimp connectors.
Pop into a local Radio Shack they will have the size, Width wise, either 1/4" (6mm) 4.8 or 3.2 also sold as speaker terminals.
I really only solder when I'm fitting a disconnect plug, molex etc. up line.
ALL of the answers above are correct !!
Having said that, please note that applying excess heat will damage the switch. Also the point about using a good quality crimper. (Not $5 from Walmart).
nat28 
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 6:54 AM / IP Logged  
burntkat wrote:
For a newb with questionable soldering skills, probably wanting to minimize tooling costs, and to maximize serviceability- most definitely use solderless terminals. See my post immediately prior this one regarding proper crimping tools and techniques.
Also, invest in some heatshrink and cover the connector after assembly, to avoid any errant shorts.
Thanks for the input. I do have a good crimping tool, however, I like that ratcheting crimper that you indicated.
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nat28 
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 7:01 AM / IP Logged  
oldspark wrote:
Agreed - especially re heatshrink tubing.
There are crimps for 2mm spades (terminals) tho I'm not sure if these are designated as 3.x mm (3.3mm?).
[ There are also 4.8mm and the all common 6.4mm aka 1/4", & 9mm etc. ]
I also recently wrote here that despite nearly 40 years of crimping it was only a few months ago I finally bought a proper ratchet crimping tool - and even that was a substitute for a refund as opposed to a fiscally acceptable desire.
But good crimps are essential. I'd strongly recommend a "proper" & good quality tool whether borrowed or invested.
Unfortunately, I have not been able to find spade terminals this small anywhere.
2013 Subaru Outback Limited
2005 Toyota Sequoia
howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 7:39 AM / IP Logged  
Radio Shack, Farnell, Mouser, RS Components in the UK/Europe etc. Google is your friend!
Custom_Jim 
Copper - Posts: 196
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 11:16 AM / IP Logged  
I just got done doing some switches like yours and opted to put connectors on them for easier replacement later if needed.
The connector size was a 0.205". They were really tight pushing onto the tabs of the switch but it was not due to the width of the connector but the terminal was made to go onto a thinner metal.
On mine I put some heat shrink over the connector.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/121766713@N04/14650236099/ newbie, connector or solder? - Page 2 -- posted image.
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nat28 
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 11:39 AM / IP Logged  
Thanks for the image. After searching, I've been able to find .110" connectors and .187" connectors (as well as standard .250"). I guess .205" is another size to look for!
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howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 11:42 AM / IP Logged  
If you're using the standard LED three terminal rotary switch (as in Custom_Jim's photo the connectors are .187", 6mm (.250") will also fit just.
Custom_Jim 
Copper - Posts: 196
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 11:51 AM / IP Logged  
howie ll wrote:
If you're using the standard LED three terminal rotary switch (as in Custom_Jim's photo the connectors are .187", 6mm (.250") will also fit just.
Looking at my reply I DID use the 0.187 connectors and not the 0.205 ones. Boy it's hell getting old.
1968 Chevy II Nova Garage Find 2012
1973 Nova Custom
1974 Spirit of America Nova
1973 Nova Pro-Street
1977 Nova (Sold)
burntkat 
Copper - Posts: 143
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 11:57 AM / IP Logged  
nat28 wrote:
burntkat wrote:
For a newb with questionable soldering skills, probably wanting to minimize tooling costs, and to maximize serviceability- most definitely use solderless terminals. See my post immediately prior this one regarding proper crimping tools and techniques.
Also, invest in some heatshrink and cover the connector after assembly, to avoid any errant shorts.
Thanks for the input. I do have a good crimping tool, however, I like that ratcheting crimper that you indicated.
My pleasure.
For $30, I was very surprised at the quality of the tool and output from it.
"Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it. - Robert A. Heinlein"
burntkat 
Copper - Posts: 143
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Posted: August 05, 2014 at 12:00 PM / IP Logged  
Custom_Jim wrote:
I just got done doing some switches like yours and opted to put connectors on them for easier replacement later if needed.
The connector size was a 0.205". They were really tight pushing onto the tabs of the switch but it was not due to the width of the connector but the terminal was made to go onto a thinner metal.
On mine I put some heat shrink over the connector.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/121766713@N04/14650236099/ newbie, connector or solder? - Page 2 -- posted image.
That's exactly what I would have done.
Protip: get a small flat-blade "tweaker" screwdriver and use it to spring open the sides of the connector's mating surface a bit. This greatly eases insertion.
(H/T Archer: "What, are we just done with the 'phrasing' thing now, or what?")
"Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it. - Robert A. Heinlein"
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