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Ground When Armed Output Purpose?


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audioman2007 
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Posted: February 27, 2008 at 7:56 PM / IP Logged  
Is it possible to overload the ground when armed output by having too many ground wires running to it? Mine has 500ma output.
attlfrank 
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Posted: February 27, 2008 at 8:56 PM / IP Logged  
from what I understand(please correct me guys)the 500ma signal is only to run a realy for a true ground(500 ma is for a relay)I had tried to use this for a security defeat(factory)and it didn't work all the time, but when I used it to run a relay directly to ground it worked
but then again,I'm not as knowagble as these guys
these guys are great
THANX AGAIN GUYS
tedmond 
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Posted: February 27, 2008 at 9:06 PM / IP Logged  

connecting too many devices to the ground output will for sure burn the output. the output eventhough its rated for 500mA, a relay draws about 150mA to energize. that can drain a battery over a few days, but yes connecting too many will overload it 

KPierson 
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Posted: February 27, 2008 at 9:35 PM / IP Logged  
Theoretically if the alarm is designed correctly the only thing that will happen is you won't have enough current to power your devices.  If the tolerances of the compoents are out of spec, or missing current limiting resistors (to save cost) then you can burn up the transistor output by putting too much load on it.
Kevin Pierson
audioman2007 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 10:58 AM / IP Logged  
Ok, I need someone to help me out with this.... I went and ordered a LED. It has 4 wires, 3 of which I will be using. The orange is to be connected to the ground when armed ouput from the alarm (which is what I will be using). The red is for constant power. The black is for ground. The white wire (wont be using) is to connect to other LED's for a network of them. Now, when I run the other 3 wires as stated above, I can program the LED BUT when I arm the system, nothing happens. When I run the black wire with the orange to the armed ouput, it then works when I arm it. I have this same problem if I run the black and red wires straight to the battery and then orange to armed output, I get nothing. So could I simply just run the orange and black wires to the armed output? This is the ONLY 2 wires that will be on that armed output wire, nothing else. Its rated for 500Ma. The LED lights up perfectly fine with no dimming or any problems. Would this work or would this ruin that output?
tedmond 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 3:01 PM / IP Logged  
be safe and use a relay. just run he black and orange together. It could be that your orange is ground and the black is your switched source.
KPierson 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 3:49 PM / IP Logged  

You really can't use a relay here as it will kill the battery.  The LED strip should be very low current, otherwise, it too would kill the battery.  I would guess that you would be OK just hooking it up to the ground when armed wire.

Kevin Pierson
audioman2007 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 6:35 PM / IP Logged  
Ok well give your input on this..... When a "such and such" output is rated for 500Ma, that means it can put out 500Ma. So given that, its saying that it puts that out and nothing more. So if a unit needs lets say 800Ma to operate, then the output will put out its 500Ma and since the unit needs 800Ma, it either wont work or will be dim, correct? So I actually cant burn it out if its only able to put out 500Ma. Just correct me if I am wrong. I wasnt going to use a relay anyways because you's told me that it will kill the battery. I just dont think that those 2 wires need more than 500Ma. I mean that means that these car alarms would have more output for those reasons.
KPierson 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 7:06 PM / IP Logged  

It actually depends on several factors.  If the alarm is of high quality and engineered to tight tolerences then the alarm will only output 500mA.

If it is a cheaply built  or poorly tolerenced unit then when you try to pull 1000mA from the output, it will deliver 1000mA at the cost of overheating / stressing the internal components (namely the Darlington transistor output).  This could cause the output to fail quickly.

On the other hand, 500mA in a car is a very large amount of current.  Unless you go crazy you should have no worries on overloading it.  Your LED array is probably no more then 25mA when it is on.  Other sensors or inputs would be even less, typically under 10mA.  The only thing of significant load that I could ever see being hooked up to the (-) when out wire is a relay, which will draw about 150-250mA.  Again though, this load, when on constantly, will kill the battery in 3-4 days of sitting.

Kevin Pierson
audioman2007 
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Posted: March 15, 2008 at 8:00 PM / IP Logged  
Well the LED needed a 15 amp fuse if that means anything
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