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Post Your Ultimate Remote Start Tips, Tricks


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Ween 
Platinum - Posts: 1,302
Platinum spacespace
Joined: August 01, 2004
Location: Illinois, United States
Posted: December 17, 2008 at 3:09 PM / IP Logged  
hi,
for the vehicles that have lower current requirements at the ignition switch...replace the heavy (12) gauge wires that come on the main connector (if i can call it that) with smaller (18) gauge wires. these would be the ignition, accessory and start outputs. still keep the heavy (12) gauge battery feeds however. reduce the values of the fuses in power feeds if doing so. try to always use negative triggered parking lights (if available in the vehicle). may need to leave fuse values at as delivered values with positive lights. on modules with multiple battery feeds, determine which feed powers which high current outputs. if vehicle has multiple feeds at ignition switch determine the same.
mark
jinstall 
Copper - Posts: 67
Copper spacespace
Joined: December 17, 2008
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posted: December 17, 2008 at 7:09 PM / IP Logged  
KarTuneMan wrote:

ckeeler wrote:
never use the 12v wires in the ignition harness to power the main 10ga power input wires on the remote start or relay satelite. if your unit has 2 12v inputs run 2 10ga wires under the hood and directly to the battery and fuse them. if your unit has 3 12v inputs, run 3 wires to the battery. use the power wires in the ignition harness for the smaller 18ga 12v input wire on the unit, bypasses, relays or any other goodies you need to power.

Unless it's a VW 2006 Golf. The battery wire at the ign. harness is good for about 110 amps.

(there are others as well... just be smart, most diagrams will tell you when the amperage is TOO LOW to use as constant, for a remote start)

most Volkswagen's actually have a lead to the fuse box that goes directly to the battery under the driver side dash. you have to be careful with it when undoing the nut though, too much torque can break the surrounding plastic, but hell, talk about a factory looking install.

chriswallace187 
Gold - Posts: 1,661
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Joined: March 11, 2002
Location: Pennsylvania, United States
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 6:49 AM / IP Logged  
Well I suppose I haven't chimed in yet...
As far as running the 12 gauge wires to the battery I think it's kind of overkill on most cars (also since I use a coathanger, it can't pull 12 gauge very well). If you have one ignition switch constant 12v wire rated at more than 10 amps, and it's not going to be powering driver's priority unlock, (+) parking lights, trunk pop, or anything else high current, I think it's allright(though you should reduce the remote start fuses accordingly).
Some late model Toyotas with multiple ignition feeds fused at 7.5A/30A or mid '90s-mid 2000s Chryslers fused at 20A/40A require special attention(you must make sure that your remote start is using the specific 12V input to power the same wires that the ignition switch would with that input) if you don't want to run direct to the battery
'01-up Chrysler minivans I've run 18-gauge to the battery since the BCM's a PITA to connect to.
Many Fords and GMs have either a BCM or fusebox with high current inputs when the ignition switches don't.
Also something that I don't think wiring info suppliers take into account: The driver's kick harness to the rear of the car almost invariably contains (+) parking light and brake light wires, and often doorlocks, trunk release, door trigger, trunk trigger. On most cars it's very easy to access and run wires to discreetly.
Additionally the steering column is often a good place to access wires. Obviously the ignition switch, but parking lights and horn are there a lot. Also on some GMs(the brand new ones have moved away from this) there is a white brake wire in the main harness on the steering column.
When using an RF-based bypass for an immobilizer, I've found that the best position for the transponder pellet(on bypasses that use that style) is as far away from the end of the antenna ring as possible. The same applies to a bypass with a ring loop - the 2 wires should go away from that end. I'll try to post a picture of this since I don't think I've described it adequately.
Also, keep any kind of RF transponder bypass away from direct contact with a metal surface, as this dissipates the RF signal.
Honda Accords with factory alarms are a pain. Best to use a data module to control them and forget about wires in the doors.
C Renner's Auto Electronix
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soundnsecurity 
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Joined: November 10, 2008
Location: Louisiana, United States
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 10:07 AM / IP Logged  
1. on GM cars with "sleepy" locks you can wake them up with a short pulse to the ignition wire before unlock.
2. not really an alarm tip but some new chrystlers have a heavy gauge ignition in the DKP that can power extra stuff
3. long zip ties are awesome for running wires through a tight dash or under carpet
4. always test your wires even if you've done the car a thousand times before
5. i dont like to mummify my wires with tape, rather, you can camouflage wires by running them with factory wire bundles and tape them to the side that you cant see. this makes it look like there is nothing installed at all. and hide the brain as high in the dash as possible.
6. T-taps suck
7. i like to take the everything apart that needs to be removed Before i connect a single wire. this usually lets you see more places to hide the brain than just looking up into the darkness and you can actually reach those places easier. it might take a little bit longer to do but it makes the install easier on you
8. black strip caulk works well to fill small holes in black textured plastic
9. pre wire your alarm specifically for each vehicle and cut the wires you dont need, but not too short. this makes everything very clean
10. as a common courtesy to other installers that might come behind you write the location of the brain and any settings that were changed from default and WHY(really important)
joch1314 
Copper - Posts: 301
Copper spacespace
Joined: March 25, 2008
Location: Texas, United States
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 1:57 PM / IP Logged  

I like number 10 on soundnsecurity's list.  Good to do, and not only for other installers but for yourself if you ever have to get back in there and you don't remember exactly what you did. 

As for my tip...I left this on another thread but, with GM trucks and SUV's from 98/99 to 06/07, the driver vent with the light and dimmer switches pops out pretty easily.  Once you get that removed there's plenty of room for hiding alarm brains back there, also relatively easy to run your wires to the appropriate spots.

...half of the truth can be worse than a lie. <----Roger Russell said that..
wrenches 
Member - Posts: 44
Member spacespace
Joined: October 22, 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 7:33 PM / IP Logged  
KPierson wrote:

Always hook up the tach wire.  Always.  Every time.

Just curious as to why. I absolutely agree that voltage sensing really doesn't cut it, especially when it can get real cold. However, the reason for a remote start to have a tach hookup is so the unit knows when the engine is running and to shut off the starter output. Lots of newer cars have "built in anti grind". Setting the remote start to send a 1.5 or 2 second output to the starter works without the need of tach.
Think. It's not illegal yet.
KPierson 
Platinum - Posts: 3,526
Platinum spaceThis member consistently provides reliable informationspace
Joined: April 14, 2005
Location: Ohio, United States
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 10:42 PM / IP Logged  
wrenches wrote:
KPierson wrote:

Always hook up the tach wire.  Always.  Every time.

Just curious as to why. I absolutely agree that voltage sensing really doesn't cut it, especially when it can get real cold. However, the reason for a remote start to have a tach hookup is so the unit knows when the engine is running and to shut off the starter output. Lots of newer cars have "built in anti grind". Setting the remote start to send a 1.5 or 2 second output to the starter works without the need of tach.

Nothing makes an installer look worse then having a car return simply because it doesn't crank long enough because they were too lazy to hook up the tach.  The tach also, in most units, will serve as an over rev protection feature that can protect the vehicle and the motor.

It will never hurt to have it hooked up, and it typically doesn't take much longer to make this one more connection.  I think if more people knew how to measure tach wires more people would hook them up.

Kevin Pierson
paidnfull 
Copper - Posts: 125
Copper spacespace
Joined: October 24, 2007
Location: Texas, United States
Posted: December 18, 2008 at 11:13 PM / IP Logged  
KPierson wrote:
wrenches wrote:
[QUOTE=KPierson]

 
it typically doesn't take much longer to make this one more connection.  I think if more people knew how to measure tach wires more people would hook them up.

Co-sign that

hurleyloser 
Copper - Posts: 157
Copper spacespace
Joined: February 05, 2005
Location: California, United States
Posted: December 19, 2008 at 1:04 AM / IP Logged  
anti-grind is a feature that prevents you from overcranking if you accidentally turn your key too far on take over, not cranking protection for remote start.
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howie ll 
Pot Metal - Posts: 16,466
Pot Metal spacespace
Joined: January 09, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: December 19, 2008 at 2:40 AM / IP Logged  
Why are people rabbiting on about tach?  If you have a Cliford product with Blackjax or the provision for rpm dependant locking, which I prefer then you have to use tach. Some thoughts on finding tach:-  If the vehicle has a coil, problem solved, its the terminal marked - or SW, pull both LT leads, one will have 12v+ on ignition, the other won't, its the one without the voltage. Distributors: some Euro-Fords still use something remarkably like a distributor, normally three or four wires going to it, it's one of these. Injector ports:- each has two wires. One colour wil be comon to all the ports, other colour will be different. It's the other (different) colour. Instrument panel. Most panels up to the late 90s had discrete wiring, if there's a tach, there's a wire, N.B. VSS if electronic speedo the same way. Engine and gearbox control units, Lord I wish I had pin-out charts for these modules. Lastly testing. (Always test) Both Snap-On and Mac market LED testers (not power probes) giving you red for neg and green for pos. The Mac one is much better quality. They are adequate and wont harm the vehicle and give a nice flashing display when you've found the right wire.
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